churches

While Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Kentucky) pushes hard to hold a final confirmation vote on Kavanaugh quickly and quietly, more organizations are ditching the sinking ship that seems to be the Supreme Court nomination. Latest; the National Council of Churches.

The Council’s website exceeded its resource limit and crashed after announcing they would advocate for the withdrawal of Kavanaugh’s nomination Wednesday.

“Judge Kavanaugh exhibited extreme partisan bias and disrespect towards certain members of the committee and thereby demonstrated that he possesses neither the temperament nor the character essential for a member of the highest court in our nation,” read their statement.

The National Council of Churches represents 40 million Christians in more than 100,000 local congregations, according to their Facebook page. Its membership is composed of over 40 denominations including most major Protestant and Eastern Orthodox denominations.

And they join a growing list of opposition to Kavanaugh. Monday, Harvard cancelled his Supreme Court class offered this winter. A leading Jesuit magazine withdrew their support as well (Kavanaugh was a student at a Jesuit prep school when he allegedly assaulted Dr. Christine Blasey Ford). Even the American Bar Association has taken a measured response to Kavanaugh after initially supporting him.

Protests of Kavanaugh have also been energetic. 128 people were arrested for protesting him after his sexual assault allegations started entering the public sphere, and 19 constituents of Senator Joe Manchin (D-West Virginia) camped out in his office to urge the Democrat holdout to commit to voting no.

The National Council of Churches’ criticism of Kavanaugh has to do with his judicial philosophy and temperament. Particularly, his troubling record on civil rights.

“Judge Kavanaugh’s extensive judicial and political record is troubling with regard to issues of voting rights, racial and gender justice, health care, the rights of people with disabilities, and environmental protections,” their statement said. “This leads us to believe that he cannot be an impartial justice in cases that are sure to come before him at the Court.”

America has sent Jesuits, Protestants and lawyers to caution against Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation. And Mitch McConnell has ignored them all.

 

Katelyn Kivel is a contributing editor and senior legal reporter for Grit Post in Kalamazoo, Michigan. Follow her on Twitter @KatelynKivel.

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